Marketer’s Edge Interview With David Dirks: Credit Union Marketing

In this episode of Marketer’s Edge we’re talking credit union marketing with David Dirks, Vice President of Marketing for the Hudson Valley Credit Union.

If your agency pursues clients in the credit union space, you’ll want to watch this episode.

A bit of background: Hudson Valley Credit Union is a full service not-for-profit financial cooperative, 300,000+ members strong. They extend membership to their neighbors who live, work, worship, volunteer or attend school in Albany, Columbia, Dutchess, Greene, Orange, Putnam, Rensselaer, Rockland, Saratoga, Schenectady, Ulster, or Westchester Counties.

The company started in October 1963, when a group of IBM employees had a vision—to create a financial cooperative for IBM employees and their families, where the needs of the individual would be placed before profit.

Why Advertising Agencies Should Watch This Episode-David talks:

  • Some of the more unique things he’s doing to bring the credit union and its community closer together.
  • Predictions on what the banking and credit union world will look like in the future.
  • The relative importance of calling out the differences between credit unions and banks – today, as compared to a decade ago.
  • How they effectively kept engagement with their customer base strong during the pandemic.
  • Any advice David would give to marketers thinking about bringing a new agency on board.
  • And lastly, if an agency was trying to knock down David’s door and attempting to win business from him, what advice he would give them.

 

A little bit about David:

David’s career in marketing & sales management spans the course of multiple industries including financial services, advertising, professional services, and the food industry.

He has worked with companies to help them blend traditional data with “big data” analytics to provide a strategic framework translating data into a tactical framework for developing marketing campaigns that drive business results.

Creating and executing marketing campaigns & programs built on a foundation of solid data (marketing) analytics is what he delivers. Focusing on revenue growth AND profitability.

Marketer’s Edge Interview With Amanda Parker-Wolery: Marketing to Multiple Audiences

In this episode of Marketer’s Edge we’re talking marketing to multiple audiences (consumers and builders), eCommerce, localized marketing, and dealer networks with Amanda Parker-Wolery, Marketing Director at Organized Living.

If your agency pursues clients in the building industry, who target dealer networks, or who focus on localized marketing, you’ll want to watch this episode.

A bit of background: Organized Living offers high-quality, innovative storage and organization products for single family builders and multifamily professionals.

From the bedroom closet to the kitchen pantry to the garage, Organized Living offers high-quality, innovative storage and organization products for single family Builders and multifamily professionals. Sold through professionally installing dealers, retailers, and online retailers.

Why Advertising Agencies Should Watch This Episode-Amanda talks:

  • How she addresses the need to localize marketing for each property yet still maintaining efficiencies in her overall spend.
  • Her goals for the organization – where she would you like to see the company 2-3 years out.
  • How Organized Living differentiates itself from competitors in the market.
  • How the company markets to each of their different audiences.
  • The design background and quality experience managing creative institutions like, most recently, The Art Academy of Cincinnati that she brings to Organized Living, and how she thinks that experience will impact how she manages the marketing of Organized Living.
  • Any advice Amanda would give to marketers thinking about bringing a new agency on board.
  • And lastly, if an agency was trying to knock down Amanda’s door and attempting to win business from her, what advice she would give them

A little bit about Amanda:

Amanda Parker-Wolery meshes her creativity with her background in marketing and strategy as Organized Living’s Director of Marketing.

She holds a BFA in Visual Communication from the University of Dayton and a MFA in 2D from the University of Cincinnati.

Find more at: https://amandaparkerwolery.wordpress.com/Amanda

Marketer’s Edge Interview With Scott Sanchez: Software Delivery Market

In this episode of Marketer’s Edge we’re talking the software delivery market with Scott Sanchez, Chief Marketing Officer at Harness.

If your agency pursues clients in software delivery, cloud initiatives, or orchestration tools, you’ll want to watch this episode.

A bit of background: Harness is a rapidly growing startup that is disrupting the software delivery market.

They are building an intelligent software delivery platform that enables engineers to deliver software faster, with higher quality, and with less effort. The Harness Software Delivery Platform includes Continuous Integration, Continuous Delivery, Feature Flags and Cloud Cost Management. The platform is designed to help companies accelerate their cloud initiatives as well as their adoption of containers and orchestration tools like Kubernetes and Amazon ECS.

Why Advertising Agencies Should Watch This Episode-Scott talks:

  • How AI plays a role in creating a better process for managing development of software.
  • Scott’s thoughts relative to what companies will be looking at 3-5 years out – whether or not companies are doomed for disaster if they don’t take the business of security and reliability seriously
  • The over-riding benefit that Harness brings to companies – a benefit that companies weren’t able to obtain prior to using Harness.
  • What developers are most often doing or using if they aren’t using a product like Harness.
  • Any advice Scott would give to marketers thinking about bringing a new agency on board
    And lastly, if an agency was trying to knock down Scott’s door and attempting to win business from him, what advice he would give them

A little bit about Scott:

Scott is a global marketing executive, growth advisor, and angel investor with a 25-year track record of creating and executing strategies that deliver results for growth-stage, VC-backed startups and Fortune 100s alike.

Prior to joining Harness as Chief Marketing Officer, Scott was Head of Cloud Native and Developer Marketing at Amazon Web Services (AWS), where he was responsible for leading the global marketing and growth efforts in a broad portfolio that spanned services across Containers, Serverless, and Developer Tools. Scott was part of the executive team that helped grow Metacloud to acquisition by Cisco, where he went on to build a global cloud marketing and growth function that helped create what has become a successful $15B+ software and subscription business.

Marketer’s Edge Interview With Michael Rauh: Banking Challenges

In this episode of Marketer’s Edge we’re talking banking challenges with Michael Rauh, President & CEO of Chelsea Groton Bank.

If your agency pursues clients in the financial space, banking, or community banking, you’ll want to watch this episode.

A bit of background: based in Groton, Connecticut, Chelsea Groton Bank is a mutually owned bank with 14 locations throughout New London County and a Loan Production Office in Hartford County. The Bank has over $1 billion in assets and serves businesses, individuals and families throughout Connecticut and Rhode Island.

Why Advertising Agencies Should Watch This Episode-Michael talks:

  • What it means to be a “mutually owned community bank” and how that’s different from just being a bank or a credit union.
  • Technology and its role in banking today.
  • Chelsea University – a concept created to benefit customers and employees benefit from it.
  • Some of the top challenges facing banks today and the challenges anticipated as we look forward into the future.
  • Opportunities that Michael sees for banks the next 3-5 years out.
  • Advice he’d give to marketers looking for a new agency.
  • Advice to agencies he’d give if they were trying to knock down his door and win his business.

A little bit about Michael:

Michael has been the President & CEO of Chelsea Groton Bank for nearly 12 years.

Prior to Chelsea Groton, Michael spent 20 years at the Washington Trust Company and 5 years at Chaffee & Partners.

Michael graduated from the University of Rhode Island with a degree in economics.

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You can also see our video series 3 Takeaways here. It’s our agency new business video series where we focus on one new business category and give you three takeaways to help improve your new business program.

If you’re looking for a more effective business development strategy, email me at lee@rswus.com. I would love to talk.

Or, if you’re not ready for that step, you can read about how our outsourced business development programs work here.

Ghosted After The First Prospect Meeting

Far too often, we see agencies build a solid connection with a productive first prospect meeting, and then… nothing.

For our three takeaways today, we have pointers to make sure you don’t get ghosted on the way to meeting number two.

And we have a bonus, a one-pager you can download with our three takeaways from this episode.

Download that here: Climbing the Prospect Follow-Up Hill

You’ve had that first prospect meeting, and ideally you’ve set the second meeting. 

But that doesn’t always happen, or it’s tentatively set, and maybe you’re getting ghosted. 

To ensure that second meeting happens, let’s get into how you can better your odds.

Your first takeaway:

Remind them why they took the first meeting with you.

If your prospect took 30 minutes of their time to meet with you, they have a need or they saw some sort of value in talking with you.

Your primary goal in that first meeting should be to determine why they decided to take the meeting.

Perhaps their current agency is underperforming.

Maybe they are interested in a strategy that aligns with your specific strengths.

In any case, your follow-up should help to re-establish their motivation for speaking to you in the first place.

OK, your second takeaway:

Provide insight on something discussed in the first meeting. 

After that first meeting, you should have some sense of the prospect’s pain-points and you should have some understanding of their past strategies.

As you prepare to follow-up with the prospect, find ways to offer valuable perspective around something you learned in that first meeting.

Show the prospect that you understand what they told you and demonstrate your resourcefulness.

And your third takeaway:

Share your experience solving problems like theirs.

Hopefully this is not the first time you’ve heard this.

Your follow-up should include examples of work you’ve done for clients in the same (or a similar) industry as the prospect’s.

This helps to alleviate any potential concerns the prospect may have about your ability to understand his/her business.

Your goal is to establish credibility, provide value, and show the prospect that you are eager to help achieve his/her goals.

Thanks for watching 3 Takeaways-lots of new business content our site to help you at rswus.com, just hit the resources drop down. 

Marketer’s Edge Interview With Adam Weinroth: Bioscience, Startups & Tech Firms

In this episode of Marketer’s Edge we’re talking with Adam Weinroth, Head of Software Marketing at Colossal Biosciences.

If your agency pursues clients in bioscience, biotech, tech firms, or startups, you’ll want to watch this episode.

A bit of background: Colossal is a breakthrough bioscience and genetic engineering company that builds radical new technologies to advance the field of genomics. Colossal creates disruptive technologies for extinct species restoration, critically endangered species protection and the repopulation of critical ecosystems that support the continuation of life on Earth.

Why Advertising Agencies Should Watch This Episode-Adam talks:

  • His experience defining positioning for new start-up businesses and how that can differ from working for a more established brand.
  • Building up his own internal demand generation team and the advantages he sees in doing that.
  • Working with SEO/SEM agencies (and provides some counsel to marketers on how to best optimize that experience.)
  • Working with start-ups and technology firms.
  • His perspective on what is required on both sides of the fence when working to establish a strong agency-client relationship.

A little bit about Adam:

Experienced, entrepreneurial, full stack marketer specializing in new category creation.

Powered by a passion for developing new products, bringing them to market, and driving business growth.

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You can also see our video series 3 Takeaways here. It’s our agency new business video series where we focus on one new business category and give you three takeaways to help improve your new business program.

If you’re looking for a more effective business development strategy, email me at lee@rswus.com. I would love to talk.

Or, if you’re not ready for that step, you can read about how our outsourced business development programs work here.

3 Business Development Strategies That Work In 2022

Lee McKnight Jr. is delivering you 3 business development strategies that come straight from your agency peers.

Welcome to “3 Takeaways”, your agency new business video series where we focus on one new business category and give you three takeaways to help improve your new business program.

We attended the AMI Conference in Chicago a few weeks back, and were privileged to moderate three different agency roundtables, with the topic, Business Development in 2022-What’s working and what’s not. 

I can’t give away all the good stuff, but for our three takeaways, I wanted to point out three tips on what’s working: what we see working with our own clients, and what agencies from our roundtables mentioned was working for them.

Here’s your first takeaway:

Try posting something personal on LinkedIn. 

Does that sound weird?

It kind of feels weird-I have not done it often, but I’m planning on doing it a bit more. 

Because it does two things-

  • Gets you more views and likes, and
  • Brings a human side to you, that prospects will respond to.

There are some ground rules here.

Do it sparingly, and provide some type of insight or reflection. 

If it’s just a post with a picture of you by the lake, or the team at happy hour, you’ll probably get some views, but then you’re just turning it into your Facebook feed.

Ideally, you tie in some aspect of your personal life, could be a reflection on something positive, or how you handled a struggle, into your work life.

I will tell you, it’s not always easy, because, and I hate this overused word, it needs to be authentic. 

But mixing one of those posts in, with every nine thought leadership posts, gives your profile more dimension-prospects work with agencies and people they like.

This will help you do that. 

Your second takeaway:

Don’t sell in every email.

Also sounds weird, right?

You need to take advantage of that email real estate with every send. 

Well, email deliverability is getting more and more important. 

The days of blasting out ineffectual, no homework emails is going away. 

Your sender reputation is incredibly important. 

If more and more of your emails are going into spam filters, Google will ding you.

If you pick one email a week, or 1 out of 4 in your cadence, and not sell to your prospect, but instead, provide them with something of value, that relates to their industry-it will help you stand out, and your prospects will respond in kind. 

It will still take time, it’s not a silver bullet, but everyone else is blindly selling, seeing what sticks. 

And your third takeaway, and it’s purely tactical:

Pursue new hires-the right way. 

A new CMO, or VP of Marketing, will have a lot on her or his plate being new on the job. If you approach them respectfully, and show your value, chances are good they’ll at least be more open to talking.

They’ll need the help. 

Doesn’t always work, and you can’t jump all over them, but there are some software platforms, like a ZoomInfo, or more inexpensive options, just Google ZoomInfo new hires, or Lead 411 new hires, and other platforms will pop us as well within that search to help you find those new hires. 

Couple that with Google alerts and LinkedIn, and you’ve got what you need.

There you go-3 business development strategies for 2022.

Thanks for watching 3 Takeaways-lots of new business content our site to help you at rswus.com, just hit the resources drop down. 

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🔔 Subscribe for more free content on how to help improve your new business program: https://bit.ly/2Mn0gXy

If you’re looking for a more effective business development strategy for your ad agency, email Lee McKnight Jr. at lee@rswus.com. He would love to talk.

Or, if you’re not ready for that step, you can read about how our outsourced business development programs work here.

Marketer’s Edge Interview With Becky Freemal: Credit Union Rebranding

In this episode of Marketer’s Edge we’re talking with Becky Freemal , Chief Marketing Communication Officer at ValleyStar Credit Union, and the discussion focuses on repositioning and rebranding credit unions.

If your agency pursues clients in the credit union space, you’ll want to watch this episode.

A bit of background: across Virginia, ValleyStar Credit Union has served businesses and families since 1953.

They help their members get beyond the dry language of mortgages, loans, accounts and credit cards to focus on what they really care about – the house they’d love to own, the bigger car, the credit card that works with their lifestyle, reaching that goal of a law degree, owning a small business or a secure retirement.

Why Advertising Agencies Should Watch This Episode-Becky talks:

The recent (2021) launch of their credit union’s repositioning and credit union rebranding and what that has done to the performance of her business.

Her move from a storied career in journalism to the world of credit union marketing – and why she decided to leave television to run marketing for a credit union.

How her life as a journalist has made her a better marketer, and better able to tell customer stories in ways that are more impactful and believable.

Her advice to marketers looking to bring on a new agency and offers counsel to agencies looking to knock down her door and win new business.

A little bit about Becky:

All Data … Big Analytics … each data point has a story.

I uncover those stories, make sense of the numbers and comprehend the impact of each one.

Stories connect people, empower relationships, measure brands. I tell those stories. I connect those people and I build those brands.

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You can also see our video series 3 Takeaways here. It’s our agency new business video series where we focus on one new business category and give you three takeaways to help improve your new business program.

If you’re looking for a more effective business development strategy, email me at lee@rswus.com. I would love to talk.

Or, if you’re not ready for that step, you can read about how our outsourced business development programs work here.

3 Tips On Crafting Effective Emails Prospects Won’t Ignore

For this episode, we’re bringing you 3 pieces of advice on how to craft effective emails from our own RSW/US new business directors.

Welcome to “3 Takeaways”, your agency new business video series where we focus on one new business category and give you three takeaways to help improve your new business program.

If you’re driving new business for your advertising agency or PR firm, you’re always looking for ways to make your emails more effective.

In this episode, we’re giving you 3 quick tips, or takeaways, directly from 3 of our new business directors here at RSW.

Your first takeaway on crafting effective emails is from Brandon Buttrey:

Shy away from links, bold, italics, underlines and attachments.

I like this one a lot, Brandon points out as well,

The e-mail should read like a conversation between two people.

I’ve talked about this before in these episodes, and it’s a prospecting mantra of mine:

Talk to your prospects, not at them.

An email full of bold or underlined copy with multiple links screams sales email.

I’m not advising you never use any of these, but early on, especially, avoid all of them-just reach out with simple text.

Your second takeaway is from Amanda Mudd:

Be literal in your subject lines.

I’ll give you an example.  You‘ve heard that your subject line should reflect, in some way, the content of your email.

So, one way to be literal in your subject line, and a great way to use your case studies, is naming the company that’s in your case study in your subject line.

And that’s it, just the company name.

It should obviously relate to the prospect’s industry you’re reaching out to, but getting your email opened is that huge first step.

And just the company name will create some interest, and quite frankly, maybe some confusion, but that’s a good thing.

Chances are better they’ll open it.

And your third takeaway is from Carrie Shoemaker:

Be Enthusiastic, upbeat, and confident.  Be memorable. 

Advice you may have heard before, but so many salespeople don’t embrace it.

Your enthusiasm and passion shows, on the phone or video, sure, but in email and voicemail as well.

There’s a balance-you don’t want to be over the top in your enthusiasm, but it humanizes you.

So much sales outreach comes off as an ad a robot wrote.

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🔔 Subscribe for more free content on how to help improve your new business program: https://bit.ly/2Mn0gXy

If you’re looking for a more effective business development strategy for your ad agency, email Lee McKnight Jr. at lee@rswus.com. He would love to talk.

Or, if you’re not ready for that step, you can read about how our outsourced business development programs work here.

Marketer’s Edge Interview With Jerry Clum: Franchise Business Common Threads

In this episode of Marketer’s Edge we’re talking with Jerry Clum, CEO of Hommati, and the discussion focuses on starting a franchise business, franchise business common threads, and capturing the attention of agents and home buyers.

If your agency pursues clients in the real estate market or franchising, you’ll want to watch this episode.

A bit of background: Hommati provides innovative services and dynamic content such as 3D Tours, Aerial Videos, Ultra HD Photography, Video Slideshows, Augmented Reality designed to help real estate agents win more listings, sell more homes, sell them faster and often for a higher sales price. Each franchise is independently owned and operated.

Why Advertising Agencies Should Watch This Episode-Jerry talks:

  • Advice he’d give to fellow entrepreneurs looking to start a franchise business.
  • The franchise business common threads that carry through all of the businesses he’s owned and run.
  • Jerry’s predictions on the state of real estate sales.
  • What makes Hommati different from the other franchise businesses Jerry has run.
  • How a brand like Hommati captures the attention of agents and home buyers.
  • What Jerry sees as the advantages and disadvantages of in-house versus bringing in an agency.
  • Advice Jerry would give to marketers thinking about bringing a new agency on board

A little bit about Jerry:
CEO, Franchisor, Entrepreneur, Consultant, and cited expert in all areas related to franchising.

And Jerry’s got a great Zig Ziglar quote on his LinkedIn page:

“You can everything in life you want, if you just help enough other people get what they want!”

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You can also see our video series 3 Takeaways here. It’s our agency new business video series where we focus on one new business category and give you three takeaways to help improve your new business program.

If you’re looking for a more effective business development strategy, email me at lee@rswus.com. I would love to talk.

Or, if you’re not ready for that step, you can read about how our outsourced business development programs work here.